From the catalogs of babes











{May 24, 2010}   where do we go from here?

I asked, “where can the interested, engaged, passionate and professionally-inclined librarians go to learn what it really means to be a professional?”

I have a lot of mixed feelings about the answer I’m about to give, but it’s the best answer, I think, for me, right now:

The Ph.D.

Yes, yes, I know it’s an academic degree, not a professional one. And I’m not actually advocating it as the best answer to my question posed above, nor do I think it ever should be. I don’t think it should ever require more school beyond a professional degree to teach professionalism–in fact, there’s probably something inherently wrong with a system structured that way.

I’m intelligent and have a good academic record, but I’m definitely more of the hands-on, practical type. I never considered myself part of the “white tower” academia elite that would ever even consider a Ph.D. But I’ve gotten to the point where the things I want to learn, the ideas I want to try, the services I want to implement and the education I want to share would be best served by returning to school to persue a doctorate in information science. (Or a position of strong decision-making authority in a small, independent, innovative, arts-focused college—I’m certainly available for that, if anyone out there reading needs such a person…)

I don’t want to be a cataloging data-entry-monkey. I don’t want to sit around writing bibliographic records for the rest of my career. I honestly mean no offense to people who do–I firmly believe it takes all types to make the world go round, and it’s always been my philosophy that even the smallest bibliographic work can make a difference in people’s lives. It’s a crucial aspect of libraries and cataloging and I love it—but I want to do more. I want to research and implement positive changes that better serve users and user groups, and I want to share those changes and ideas and discoveries with the rest of the field. My hope is that someday all of that would be a key element of professional librarianship, but until then, it looks like I’ll have to follow a more established route.

So starting in September, I’ll be working on a Ph.D. at the University of Washington’s iSchool, in Seattle, WA.

(I’m sure those who took offense to my previous posts will either be thankful that I’m going back to school to have some more education to set me straight, or quivering with fear at the prospect that I may be the next generation of cataloging faculty…)

This is obviously something I didn’t decide overnight. The idea has been percolating in my head ever since ALA Midwinter 2009, when I met Allyson Carlyle during a UW information session. There to keep my significant other company since he was interested in the UW MLIS program, I struck up a conversation with Dr. Carlyle, as we were both on the same task force. I mentioned some of the things I was doing, like publishing articles and book chapters and presenting at conferences, and she asked me why I wasn’t working on a doctorate, since I was already doing the same sort of work it would require. Her comments stuck with me long enough to start the application process last fall, and I was accepted to the program in March.

It was a tough decision to make, but in a roundabout way I’m grateful to my library for making it easier for me to make the choice to leave. Had either my reclassification proposal or the migration to a new ILS been given the green light, I would have wanted to stay, to work on those projects and see them through. When they were both summarily rejected in April, the decision was clear. There wasn’t much left here for me to work on besides the weekly delivery of materials to be cataloged. Maybe that’s enough for other people, but that’s not enough for me. I want to do more than that. I want to make a difference not only to my local library, but all libraries, to librarianship, to cataloging, the way we approach it and implement it and teach it.

I tried to make a difference here. I did all I thought I could here to make the library better for patrons, for everyone. It didn’t always work, but I like to think I gave it a darn good shot. And I’m not giving up. I may be done trying here, but I’m certainly not done trying.

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Congratulations, Ivy, on being accepted! I’m not surprised by this, actually…like Prof. Carlyle and you, I think you’ve been doing the same work for years; actually getting the degree only seems like the next logical step.

Now, I’m curious about the nifty research you’re going to do.



Kathleen says:

Go, Ivy!

That’s great news! You’ll be a fabulous Ph. D.

I’d like to do it myself, but don’t think it will work for me financially. I’m thrilled that this has worked out for you.



Very happy to read of your decision. I can’t think of anyone better for you to study with than Dr. Carlyle. I do hope you consider working towards being a professor who teaches and researches in the cataloging and classification arena. We are so few.

Was also pleased to read your motivations for pursuing doctoral studies—questions, questions, always more questions. Needing to understanding something more deeply. That is the best way to start. I, too, got my MLS and then was cataloging day in and day out and at some point realized I needed something more.

Good luck and hope that you will continue your blog as you begin your new direction. I look forward to meeting you at conferences and grilling you on your new knowledge and ideas.



Susan says:

Oh, congratulations! This is wonderful news!



Holly says:

Good for you! I completely agree with all of your reasons, especially day-to-day cataloging not being enough. I’ve been fortunate in my own position that I’ve had the opportunity to move beyond that, and I’m certainly hoping for the best for you!



Hi Ivy, I’m really happy for you. I look forward to your continuing contributions to our field. Hope you can keep the blog going, too!



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